Materials and Textures

These are some materials and textures authoring guidelines to follow before exporting to Shockwave 3D*.

Material and Texture Names

All materials and textures must have a unique name. Use the 3ds max 4* Material Editor to change the default "Material #n" or "Map #n" names assigned by 3ds max 4.

The names of the Shockwave 3D materials and textures are derived as follows:

3ds max 4

Shockwave 3D

Name of material

Name of shader

Name of material

Name of material

Name of texture

Name of texture.
Note: This is not the filename of the image used by the texture (in the case of bitmap textures).

Material Properties

The mapping of surface properties as defined by the 3ds max 4 Standard Material is as follows:

3ds max 4

Shockwave 3D

Ambient color

Ambient color

Diffuse color

Diffuse color

Self-Illumination color

Emission color

Specular color multiplied by Specular level

Specular color

Reflectivity value

Glossiness value

Opacity value

Opacity value

Texturing Differences

Shockwave 3D and 3ds max 4 use textures differently. Shockwave 3D is a real-time 3D engine, rendering the entire scene many times a second, while 3ds max 4 takes many tens of seconds to render a scene.

Because 3ds max 4 uses texture maps differently than Shockwave 3D, which adds, blends, or multiplies various bitmaps together to simulate lighting effects, various 3ds max 4 map channels were used to represent Shockwave 3D texture layers with a different purpose.

In Shockwave 3D, texture is applied in the following manner:

  1. The model's diffuse color is determined from either its material properties or a bitmap.

  2. The diffuse color is modified by combination with successive layers of textures that simulate reflection and lighting effects.

  3. The specular reflection of the model is modulated by the gloss map.

In general, here is how shading compares:

3ds max 4 (maps)

Shockwave 3D (layers)

Standard Material diffuse color

Diffuse color used only if no diffuse color is applied to model.

RGB diffuse map settings

Base texture.

Color of textures override diffuse color. RGB diffuse map Amount control ignored.

RGB diffuse map alpha channel values less than 255 allow the diffuse color from the MAX Standard Material to be seen through the diffuse map

Alpha channel values less than 255 make the model transparent. Because most video cards are set to respond only to a single bit of the alpha channel, the model will appear either totally opaque (alpha value greater than or equal to 128) or totally transparent (alpha value less than 128). The number of bits to use from the map's alpha channel can be specified in Lingo from the textureRenderFormat property of the RenderServices object.

RGB Reflection map

Reflection texture.

The reflection map is blended with the current color of the model (the diffuse color from the 3ds max 4 Standard Material, or the diffuse map). The resulting color of the model is the combination of the reflection map and the current color of the model. RGB reflection map Amount control ignored.

RGB Gloss map

Gloss texture.

The bitmap values are multiplied by the specular color of the model. Areas where the Gloss map is white will have the full specular highlights in the color specified by the specular color of the model. Areas where the Gloss map is black will have no specular highlights. All other gloss colors will act to mute the specular highlights on the model. RGB Gloss map Amount control ignored.

RGB Filter map

Diffuse lighting texture.

The bitmap values are multiplied by current color of the model. This is used to simulate diffuse lighting on a model. Where the bitmap values are white, the model's current color will remain unchanged. Where they are black, the model's current color will be replaced with black, simulating deep shadow. Where the bitmap values are gray, the multiplication of the gray value with the model color will desaturate the model color, simulating its color in partial shadow. RGB Filter map Amount control ignored.

RGB Refraction map

Specular lighting texture.

The bitmap values are added to the current color of the model. This is used to simulate specular reflection. Where the bitmap values are white, the model's current color will wash out, simulating the saturation of a model resulting from a strong specular highlight. Where the bitmap values are black, the model's current color will remain unchanged. Gray values will boost the model's color, simulating the additional specular reflection you get from glossier portions of the model. RGB Refraction map Amount control ignored.

Texture Alpha Values

Do not use textures with pre-multiplied alpha values. Alpha channel information in a texture should be stored in a separate alpha channel of the diffuse texture map.

Opacity Map

Do not use a texture map to specify opacity. Only the use of an alpha channel in a diffuse texture map, for example, a 32-bit Targa image, will produce opacity effects.

Texture Coordinates

Generate texture coordinates on all objects using bitmap textures. If you do this with the UVW Mapping modifier, make sure that these coordinates are applied to Map Channel 1.

Textures Not Supported

Do not use multiple texture coordinates, or any mapping channels above 1 for meshes. Use a single UVW modifier on a model that puts its results in mapping channel 1. To get multiple textures on a single model using a single set of texture coordinates, assign different parts of the mesh different material IDs, and then assign different materials and textures to these parts of the mesh using a Multi/Sub-Object material.

Do not use materials with hierarchical textures, that is, any materials specified in a Mix Map, a Composite Map, or any other 3ds max 4 map used for compositing, blending, or masking a map.

Do not use 3D procedural maps; use only 2D procedural maps, like Gradient Ramp or Checker.

Do not use environment maps and environment mapping coordinates.

UV Manipulation in Bitmap Texture

Do not use any UV or Width and Height changes made in the Cropping/Placement portion of the Bitmap Parameters rollout of the Bitmap texture. Any non-default settings in this rollout will be ignored, possibly resulting in unexpected texture placement. Note that the Possible Problems converting scene to Shockwave 3D window will not report this problem.

Material Editor UVW Manipulation

Texture mapping is controlled exclusively by UVW coordinates.

Use only the non-animating UVW adjustment features of the UVW Map and Unwrap UVW modifiers.

Do not use the Material Editor to set the texture coordinates of a map. This is ignored in the export.

Use a multi/sub-object material and set the proper Material ID to texture map part of an object without tiling.

Material Vertex Color

Do not use vertex colors with the Vertex Paint modifier or the Assign Vertex Colors utility.

Creating a Material or Texture Library

To build a Shockwave 3D file that contains a library of textures or materials for use in any arbitrary 3D scene in Director, do the following:

For a material library:

Note: Remember to reselect the other checkboxes the next time you export.

For a texture library:

Note: Remember to reselect the other the checkboxes the next time you export.

You can also create scenes that contain complex combinations of materials and textures. Make sure to name everything descriptively so that users of the resulting combined material and texture library can figure out which textures go with which materials.

Keep in mind that other users may be creating libraries of materials or textures for Shockwave 3D. Use a naming convention that will minimize the chance of another user creating another material or texture with the same name.

Materials Supported

Use of only 3ds max 4 standard materials and multi/sub-object are supported.

Materials Not Supported

Do not use animated textures or video sequences as a material. You can achieve the same result in Director* by changing the model's style every frame, or changing the textures used by a shader every frame.

 

 

*See asterisked (*) statement at Legal Information © 2001 Intel Corporation.